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If the Walls Could Talk...

 

 

We all have our own morning routines during the school year, most of which comprise of waking up, waking the kids up, making their lunches, making their breakfasts and then dropping them off at the bus stop or at school. It’s something that we repeat every morning, most of the time without thinking about what kind of routine our children go through between the hours of 7:00 and 3:00. We know they go to class, lunch and maybe recess, but what goes on during each of these? When our children get back from school we all ask the same question: “So did anything happen at school today?” and we all get some variation of the same answer, “No, not really.” Unless we attend school with our children for a day, there’s no way of knowing what really goes on. But if the walls could talk; we may learn a lot.

 

6:30 AMThe door to the walk-in freezer in the cafeteria was accidently left open on Friday afternoon. Unfortunately all of the cafeteria lunches for this week have to be thrown away because the food has spoiled.

 

7:00 AM: The bus broke down and students had to stand in the cold for almost an hour waiting until the school sent a replacement bus.

 

8:30 AM: The students are now thirty minutes late to school because of the bus issues; they hurry to homeroom without noticing that the door did not fully close behind them.

 

8:45 AM: An irate parent waltzes right through the now open front door and heads straight to the principal’s office to discuss the mishandling of the buses that morning.

 

9:30 AM: While switching classes students notice that the floors of the math wing are soaking wet; a toilet overflowed in the girl’s bathroom. Students are now attempting to maneuver their way around the water as best they can, with a few falling and getting injured in the process.

 

11:00 AM: Lunchtime. Students start filing into the cafeteria looking for their friends and a table to sit at, while toting their brown bags. One student is eating her favorite sandwich, peanut butter and jelly. She didn’t think twice before handing a friend her water bottle for a sip, not knowing that she has a peanut allergy.

 

11:45 AM: It’s time for the best part of the day, recess. A few kids are racing across the monkey bars and one falls off and lands right on top of his arm.

 

12:30 PM:  During class a student pulls out his phone, when the teacher asks him to put it away the student refuses. The teacher threatens to send the student to the principal’s office and the student walks out of the classroom. The angry student is now walking through the hallways by himself.

 

2:30 PM: It’s “lab day” in the science wing, the fifth graders are doing an experiment and someone runs into a desk and knocks over a Bunsen burner. The fire alarm loudly notifies everyone to leave the building. Students, teachers and staff start pouring out of all sides of the school.

 

3:00 PM: The school day is over; parents and buses start arriving to pick up the kids, who are still standing outside. Panicked parents start exiting their cars to approach the school to figure out what is going on.

 

Now, we know this sounds like a 24 hour nightmare, but these are real life situations that can happen every day. What if the right people knew what was happening when it was happening, all from their own communication device? Advances in technology have made this a reality. In a school setting it is important for the right people to be informed in order for them to take action as soon as they can. It doesn’t matter whether it’s a toilet overflowing, a food allergy or a fire in the building; there are ways to notify the necessary people and increase the response times from people inside and outside of the building. Companies like Status Solutions have streamlined communication in order to address these issues by informing the right people at the right time with the imperative information they need.

 

So, next time your child gets home from school and you ask the classic question, “Did anything happen at school today?” don’t take no for an answer.